Understanding Number Types

The type of communication you want to have with your users or customers will determine what number is best for you.

Types of numbers

There are broadly 3 types of numbers: long code, toll-free, and short code.

Long code (local) numbers are the most common type of number. For example, a household phone number is a long code number. They have 10 digits, the first 3 of which correspond to the number's exchange code, commonly called an area code. Overall, local numbers feel personal and familiar. For some local businesses and organizations, this might make a local long code number the best choice.

Toll-free numbers use a specially designated exchange code, like 800, 888, 877, 866, 855, 844, or 833. The name "toll-free" comes from the numbers' original purpose, which was to give individuals a way to contact businesses without incurring any long-distance or call minute charges. This still applies today, although only for landline callers. Toll-free numbers are specifically business-related and can be made more memorable with phrases. For businesses with a widespread customer-base or a strategic marketing need, a toll-free number is likely the better fit.

Short code numbers have 5 or 6 digits and are used for messaging. They are often used by organizations, typically at a higher cost per message than regular messages. Short codes are not currently available for all users. For those interested in using short codes, contact support to discuss your campaign.


FreeClimb Numbers

FreeClimb offers both local long code and toll-free numbers to all accounts. While trial accounts have some limitations on outbound communication and use of multiple numbers, there are no restrictions on the types of numbers that you can purchase with an upgraded account. For those interested in using short codes, contact support to discuss your campaign.

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Trial accounts are automatically assigned a long code number

Because trial account limits align with most long code use cases, your trial account will automatically be assigned a long code number. However, once you upgrade your account, make sure to match your use case with the appropriate number type by referring to the table below in order to avoid carrier filtering, blocking, and/or potential suspension of your account, especially for A2PA2P - Application-to-Person. Generally used to refer to automated messaging, this is one-way SMS in which recipients are not expected to respond. use cases.


Compare to choose which is best for you

Long Code

Toll-Free

Short Code

Digits

10

10

5 - 6

Messaging capable

Yes

Yes

Yes

Voice capable

Yes

Yes

No

Messaging use cases

Person-to-Person (P2P):
• SMS customer service
• anonymous communication
• SMS communication with a rideshare or delivery service

Application-to-Person (A2P):
• SMS marketing
• appointment reminders
• chat bots
• notifications
• one-time passwords (OTPs)

High Volume A2P:
• alerts
• marketing
• reminders

Messages per second (mps)

1 mps

3 mps

This number can be increased for upgraded accounts. Contact support for more information.

100 mps

Contact support if you are interested in using short codes.

Voice use cases

Local businesses and organizations

Businesses with a widespread customer-base or a strategic marketing need

N/A

Carrier filtering

Yes. Carriers will filter and block most A2P messaging use cases and suspected spam based on content and messaging per second.

Yes. Carriers will filter and block users who are suspected of sending spam or nuisance calls and messages. See FreeClimb's Acceptable Use Policy and CTIA Best Practices to avoid any violations which may lead to filtering, blocking, and/or suspension of your account.

No. However, you must follow the short code plan you initially submitted to the FreeClimb team.

Updated 3 months ago


Understanding Number Types


The type of communication you want to have with your users or customers will determine what number is best for you.

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